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Noma Disease

Noma Disease mind map
December 2023 News
WHO Recognition
Included in NTDs
Official list of neglected tropical diseases
Decision by
17th meeting of STAG-NTD
Strategic and Technical Advisory Group
Significance
Addresses underrecognized health challenges
Commitment to vulnerable populations
Why
Reasons for Recognition
Amplify global awareness
Catalyse research and funding
Boost control efforts
Multisectoral approaches
Universal health coverage
What
Disease Description
Gangrenous stomatitis
Cancrum oris
Affects mouth and face
Rapid progression
Affected Demographics
Young children
Age 2 to 6 years
Regions of extreme poverty
Global Presence
Mostly in sub-Saharan Africa
Reported in Americas and Asia
Where
Areas of Prevalence
Sub-Saharan Africa
Americas
Asia
Who
Vulnerable Populations
Malnourished children
Weakened immune systems
Extreme poverty
Key Personalities
Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus
Role
WHO Director-General
Spearheading Nations
Nigeria
Submitted official request
On behalf of 32 Member States
How
Disease Progression
Starts as gum inflammation
Rapid spread
Destroys facial tissues and bones
Causative Agents
Bacteria in mouth
Risk Factors
Poor oral hygiene
Malnutrition
Infections
Weakened immune systems
Treatment and Prevention
Early Detection
Essential for effective therapy
Acute necrotizing gingivitis
Treatment Options
Antibiotics
Penicillin, sulfonamides
Amoxicillin, metronidazole
Nutritional Supplements
Vitamin A, high-protein diet
Hydration
Disinfectant Mouthwash
Chlorhexidine, salt water
Stages of Noma
Stage I to IV
Specific treatments
Reconstruction
Post-treatment
Oral and maxillofacial surgery
Plastic surgery
Usually one year after intervention
Prevention Strategies
Check for gingivitis
Oral hygiene education
High-protein diet
Vitamin A supplements

Noma disease, recently recognized as a neglected tropical disease by WHO, is a severe gangrenous condition affecting the mouth and face, primarily impacting malnourished children aged 2 to 6 in poverty-stricken regions. Its rapid progression leads to facial tissue and bone destruction, often resulting in death or severe disfigurement. Noma is caused by oral bacteria, exacerbated by poor hygiene, malnutrition, and weakened immunity. Early detection and treatment, primarily through antibiotics and nutritional support, are crucial. WHO’s inclusion of noma as an NTD underscores its commitment to addressing this long-neglected health challenge, aiming to boost awareness, research, and multisectoral intervention efforts.

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