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[Mains Static] Role of Media and Social Networking Sites in Creating Internal Security Challenges

The Media and social networking sites are fast becoming a double-edged sword in the internal security regime. The digital and data revolution has exponentially increased the reach of traditional/digital media and social media. The potential of threats emanating from media to internal security is immense. In this article we shall discuss both sides of the two faces of new age media.

Deep Fake – The Greatest Threat to the Idea of Truth

Recent advancements in artificial intelligence (AI) and cloud computing technologies have led to rapid development in the sophistication of audio, video, and image manipulation techniques. This synthetic media content is commonly referred to as “deepfakes.” Deepfakes are one of the serious threat of our times. The word ‘deepfake’ is a combination of deep learning (a subset of the artificial intelligence) and the word ‘fake’. The result of the increase in deepfakes has caused across the globe in damaging and sinister ways. Recently, the US Senate has approved a deepfake bill to defend against manipulated media and the proposed legislation calls for research to detect synthetic shams online. Also, the Bombay High Court recently has sought a report on Telegram DeepFake bot creating fake nudes of women. In this context, let’s make a detailed analysis of Deepfake.

Information Technology (Intermediary Guidelines and Digital Media Ethics Code) Rules 2021 (New IT Rules)

Recently, the Government of India notified the new Information Technology (Intermediary Guidelines and Digital Media Ethics Code) Rules 2021 in the wake of growing concern around transparency, accountability and rights of users related to digital media. The rules aim to regulate social media, digital media, and OTT (Over The Top) platforms. The Rules provide broad powers to the government to regulate and monitor social media intermediaries including online news media. The Rules have been framed in exercise of powers under section 87 (2) of the Information Technology Act, 2000 and in supersession of the earlier Information Technology (Intermediary Guidelines) Rules 2011. The Rules are considered to be an instrument of a “soft-touch” oversight mechanism. The Part-II of these Rules shall be administered by the Ministry of Electronics and Information and Technology and Part-III will be administered by the Ministry of Information and broadcasting.

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Nancy Garg
Nancy Garg
1 year ago

good

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